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Happy New Year’s everyone!  The New Year brings with it an opportunity to start anew.  In our culture, it is quite common to make New Year’s resolutions.  The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines a resolution as “the act of finding an answer or solution to a conflict, problem, etc.”  A resolution is basically a goal.  I think it is great that people use the New Year to make resolutions.  Having goals for oneself is always encouraged.  People relate well to cycles; a new year is essentially the natural beginning of a cycle, thus a relatively convenient time to set goals.  Obviously, we should not confine resolutions or goals to New Year’s Day.  We should all be in a state of continually developing and progressing ourselves.

We are all aware of the ease of making a goal or resolution compared to the challenge of actually sticking with them.  I feel our resolutions should focus more on our process or progress toward a goal as opposed to the goal itself. Notice that I say progress.  Progress indicates positive, consistent actions toward an expectation or goal.   We have a much greater likelihood of keeping our resolutions, no matter when they are made, if we are focused more on the consistent actions to reach a goal.  Consistency in our actions leads to growing confidence, which strengthens our resolve in progressing toward our goals. We must have resolve in our resolutions.   Achieving success is a process and not an event!

 

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I know it is not easy to be cheerful when after doing your best, everything you do just go wrong or don’t turn out the way you expected. When your business enterprise you started that looked really…

Source: Give it Another Try

It-s-all-good-baby-babyWow!!  We are already half way through 2016.  To think, just 6 months ago, many of us made New Year’s Resolutions, committing ourselves to some sort of improvement in our lives.   Fast-forward to the present.  Where do you stand with your goal or resolution?  Were you able to stick with it?  If so, I congratulate you on your dedication and persistence.  On the flip side, however, is the cold reality that many of us have abandoned our resolutions.  And know what?  That’s ok.…….you are still on the path to accomplishing your goal!  I want to encourage you to regroup and refocus.  Remember, success is a process and not an event.  In many cases, the process involves some stumbles, whether it is failure or losing focus.  If you slipped up, the past is the past; it is what it is.  Learn from it and apply it to the future.  You can get back on track. It’s all good.

success

We are all aware of the ease of making a goal compared to the challenge of actually sticking with it.  Our goals should focus more on our process or progress toward a goal as opposed to the goal itself. Notice that I say progress.  Progress indicates positive, consistent actions toward an expectation or goal.   We have a much greater likelihood of sticking with our goals if we are focused more on the consistent actions to reach a goal.  Consistency in our actions leads to growing confidence, which strengthens our resolve in progressing toward our goals.  To be successful, we must consistently make progress.  Success doesn’t happen overnight; it takes time.  Achieving success is a process and not an event!

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Success is a process, not an event.  Here are 5 steps to help us achieve success:

  1. Make a commitment to yourself. It has to become a part of you. You can:
  • Write your goal down.
  • Make a poster or screensaver of the goal.
  • Set a daily reminder on your phone of your goal.
  1. A support system of like-minded, POSITIVE people (see Iron Sharpens Iron).
  2. Focus on behaviors that support your goal, not the actual goal itself. Behaviors that support the goal will lead to fulfilling the goal.
  3. Be flexible. The timing and tools you have may not be ideal, but they are usually enough to get you moving in the right direction.
  4. Be resilient. Distractions and disappointments will come.  Take time to reflect upon them, but do not dwell on them.  Get back on track!

well rounded

 

Not too long ago, I had a conversation with a student about his future plans.  The young man shared how he desires to be a professional athlete yet, isn’t on any of our teams (junior varsity, varsity) for that particular sport.  In his favor, he is an underclassman.  Of course, I asked about other interests; he answered that he is only interested in being an athlete.  He felt that having an alternative equated to doubt and that is why some youth don’t achieve such lofty goals as becoming a professional athlete or musician.

I told him I agree you must have faith in yourself in achieving your dreams; however, this must be balanced out with knowledge of what it will take to achieve that dream. Understanding the challenges can help in making good decisions in the process of achieving goals. I explained to him how every professional athlete, even benchwarmers and journeymen, was probably a star on their team in high school or college.  Developing a goal or interest outside of his goal of being a professional athlete won’t detract from it; it can actually enhance it.  The same holds true for adult life; expanding our knowledge is beneficial and increases our value to ourselves and others.